Teddy Roosevelt: Icon of Masculinity

  1. “Roosevelt, Theodore.” American Masculinities: A Historical Encyclopedia. Ed. Bret E. Carrol. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2003. 402-03. Print.
  2. This excerpt from American Masculinities discusses how Teddy Roosevelt was viewed as a huge promoter of the idea of masculinity. It goes into discussing his life and the various aspects that drew reasoning for him being considered an icon of masculinity. He lived on a ranch in the Dakota Territories for a long period of time where he leaned to live a rugged lifestyle. He most likely drew the most attention as a manly figure due to his role in the Spanish-American war. He assembled a group of cowboys they dubbed the “rough riders” to go defend the American boarder from the invading Mexicans. This allowed him to be renowned as a war hero, later helping him obtain presidency. He symbolized a rugged, adventure loving man taking trips to Africa to hunt big game and clinging to the idea of a western frontier.
  3.  This except relates to my paper as I can draw connections between the image of masculinity Teddy portrayed to the American people, versus the image Trujillo conveyed to the Dominican people.
  4. This was aimed at people looking to learn more about historic masculine figures in history.
  5. As I said above the biggest contribution will be the comparison between the image of masculinity Teddy portrayed to the American people, versus the image Trujillo conveyed to the Dominican people. This will allow me to see the differences of what these cultures stress as truly masculine.

https://books.google.com/books?id=c5t2AwAAQBAJ&lpg=PA403&ots=KDXzZv0QnG&dq=theodore%20roosevelt%20masculinity&pg=PA403#v=onepage&q=theodore%20roosevelt%20masculinity&f=false

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